Table of Contents

Comparative Environmental Economic Assessment

Comparative Environmental Economic Assessment

Edited by Raymond J.G.M. Florax, Peter Nijkamp and Kenneth G. Willis

Over the last decade, economists have increasingly recognized the role of meta-analysis and value transfer in synthesizing knowledge and efficiently exploiting the existing pool of knowledge. Comparative Environmental Economic Assessment explores the potential significance of using these techniques, particularly in environmental economics. Both meta-analysis and value transfer constitute major research tools which efficiently use knowledge previously acquired from other studies. The book focuses on the potential role and usefulness of these tools in environmental economic research, and goes on to address their validity, relevance and applicability

Preface

Edited by Raymond J.G.M. Florax, Peter Nijkamp and Kenneth G. Willis

Subjects: economics and finance, environmental economics, environment, environmental economics

Extract

Over the last two decades numerous studies have dealt with the comparative assessment of economic impacts of environmental policy making. Environmental policy making, and the investigation of environmental sideeffects in other policies, have been stimulated by the recognition that sustainable development is of pivotal importance for secure and viable living conditions for current and future generations. In fact, the well-known Brundtland definition of sustainability is based exactly on this recognition. Moreover, a stricter interpretation of accountability of government behaviour, and the much more pronounced necessity of tracking costs and benefits during times of scarcity of public funds, have increased the quest for knowledge about economic impacts of environmental policy. It is obvious that the efficiency and efficacy of environmental policy making assumes a proper understanding of its impacts. The availability of numerous environmental impact assessment studies and the persistent quest for knowledge and information about environmental economic impacts contribute to the relevance of the pursuit of synthetic views on the issue. Can one rely on a state-of-the-art literature review? Is a more rigorous statistical approach in a comparative research framework a more appealing and useful endeavour to synthesize research on environmental economic effects? What is the validity of such an approach, and can the results be generalized to an extended population? If one is in need of a policy assessment for a specific policy site that has not been researched in detail, can research synthesis provide a useful assessment? Can point-estimates or functions...