Table of Contents

Measuring Environmental Degradation

Measuring Environmental Degradation

Developing Pressure Indicators for Europe

Edited by Anil Markandya and Nick Dale

Measuring Environmental Degradation is a unique book that provides a comprehensive yet concise overview of the key issues of environmental significance addressed as part of the Eurostat ‘Environmental Pressure Indicators Project’. The book is part of the ‘Towards Environmental Pressure Indicators for the EU’ (TEPI) series that has resulted from the project.

Editor's introduction

Edited by Anil Markandya and Nick Dale

Subjects: environment, environmental sociology

Extract

Editors’ introduction This collection of essays on the theme of developing pressure indicators for Europe has been compiled as part of the Pressure Indicators Project (PIP), undertaken by Eurostat, the Statistical Office of the European Communities. The PIP aims to produce a set of indicators describing pressures resulting from human activities, which are intended to communicate environmental information to decision-makers and a wider public without losing the scientific soundness of the original indicators. Thus each indicator should describe the pressure in a comprehensive and analytically sound way, while at the same time being easy to interpret and capable of revealing trends on an appropriate time-scale. The PIP project is divided into ten ‘policy fields’ (based on the seven themes of the Fifth Environmental Action Programme1) chosen to reflect the decisionmaking structure of the central institutions within the European Union, such as national and regional governments and the European Commission, which will be the focus for policy changes to improve environmental sustainability. These policy fields are: Air Pollution, Climate Change, Loss of Biodiversity, Marine Environment and Coastal Zones, Ozone Layer Depletion, Resource Depletion, Dispersion of Toxic Substances, Urban Environmental Problems, Waste and Water Pollution and Water Resources. Ten specialized institutes (SIs) corresponding to each of the ten policy fields were selected to coordinate much of the project’s work. A list of the SIs is given in Annex II. The SIs established Scientific Advisory Groups (SAGs), selected from senior natural scientists and experts in the ten policy fields...