Extending the Eclectic Paradigm in International Business

Extending the Eclectic Paradigm in International Business

Essays in Honor of John Dunning

Edited by H. Peter Gray

John Dunning is undoubtedly the world’s leading scholar on the subject of multinational corporations and international business. This collection of original essays is designed to honor this work, particularly his achievements during his association with Rutgers University.

Chapter 1: Dunning’s Rutgers Years

H. Peter Gray

Subjects: business and management, international business

Extract

H. Peter Gray John Dunning has always had an element of the scholar gypsy in him. It was this wanderlust that allowed him to accept a Seth Boyden visiting professorship of international business (IB) at Rutgers – the State University of New Jersey for eighteen months beginning in 1987. While he was a visiting member of the faculty of the Business School, Governor Thomas Kean of New Jersey decided to fund the creation, at Rutgers, of six ‘State of New Jersey professorships’ to be awarded to world-class scholars in six different fields. Serendipity had begun to exert its influence and the then dean, David Blake, succeeded in 1989 in bringing Dunning to the School of Business of Rutgers as one of the six. This was to be a long-term relationship as distinct from the avowedly temporary visiting Seth Boyden professorship. The appointment was a complex arrangement because of the need for John to continue as a member of the faculty of the University of Reading until the end of 1992 when he would reach mandatory retirement age in the United Kingdom. John was a regular member of the Rutgers Business faculty for alternate calendar years. However, he always visited Newark once or twice in the ‘off years’ in order to meet with his graduate students and to goad those who were not giving the writing of their dissertations the wholehearted commitment which was both deserved and needed. This book is a tribute to the contributions made by Dunning to...

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