Forecasting Labour Markets in OECD Countries

Forecasting Labour Markets in OECD Countries

Measuring and Tackling Mismatches

Labour Markets and Employment Policy series

Edited by Michael Neugart and Klaus Schömann

This book offers a wide-ranging overview of the state of labour market forecasting in selected OECD countries. Besides presenting forecasting models, the contributions provide an introduction to past experiences of forecasting, highlight the requirements for building appropriate data sets and present the most up-to-date forecasts available.

Preface and Acknowledgements

Edited by Michael Neugart and Klaus Schömann

Subjects: social policy and sociology, labour policy

Extract

Most of the contributions in this volume on forecasting labour market trends stem from the workshop ‘Learning Processes and Future Needs of Qualifications in the OECD’, held at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung (WZB). The set of papers presented there has been updated in terms of the forecasts made, and augmented with contributions from other countries in order to broaden the spectrum of perspectives and issues covered. Thus, the book gives a wide-ranging overview of the state of labour market forecasting as it stands in the selected countries right now. To make the research done in this field accessible for a broad readership, the contributors tried to boil down the technical descriptions of the models employed to their most important features. Besides presenting forecasting models, the contributions provide an introduction to the history of forecasting in each country concerned, highlight the requirements for building appropriate data sets and present the most up-to-date forecasts. In most cases the forecasts project mismatches on the labour market as they are likely to occur in the coming years with respect to occupational groups, qualifications and employment in specific sectors. The country examples show how information on labour market trends is disseminated and used by various actors, such as policymakers, firms and individuals. It becomes clear that forecasting labour market trends can help all these groups make better informed decisions. Viewed in this way, forecasting may help to reduce individual risks associated with employment careers. To a certain extent it serves...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information