The Urban Response to Internationalization

The Urban Response to Internationalization

Peter Karl Kresl and Earl H. Fry

Three decades of accelerated trade and financial market liberalization have had significant and lasting impacts on the global economy and its component entities. In this volume, Peter Karl Kresl and Earl Fry examine the impacts of these profound changes on the economies of urban areas, and the responses to them. They provide a comprehensive treatment of the issues surrounding internationalization, such as urban transport, communication, and production. In addition, the authors explore the effects of internationalization on municipal foreign affairs, urban governance, inter-city relations and structures, and strategic planning.

Preface

Peter Karl Kresl and Earl H. Fry

Subjects: economics and finance, public sector economics, urban economics, urban and regional studies, urban economics, urban studies

Extract

The subject of the response of urban economies to the increasing pace of internationalization or, to use a word that has gained great popularity in recent years, globalization, is receiving a great deal of attention by scholars and by local officials during the past two decades. Perhaps it was the shock of the ten-fold increase in the price of crude petroleum that forced the economies both of developed and less-developed nations to comprehend that they have to restructure their economic activities on a new footing, with new power relationships and new actors in all areas of the economy. National governments imposed constraints on their capacity to intervene in their own economies on behalf of negatively affected constituents, and lower barriers to movements of capital, goods and services have made all economies vulnerable to new threats and challenges but also to new opportunities. It should be noted parenthetically that movement of workers in response to economic incentives has been limited by both national policy and the various attractions of place. In this environment cities have found themselves, on the one hand, to be the governmental entity that is most affected by these developments and, on the other hand, the governments that are most suited to formulate responses to them. This book is an examination of the several aspects of this situation in which local governments now find themselves. First a word about terminology. We have chosen to use the word internationalization in the title rather than the obvious alternative – globalization....