Developments in the Economics of Copyright

Developments in the Economics of Copyright

Research and Analysis

Edited by Lisa N. Takeyama, Wendy J. Gordon and Ruth Towse

This innovative and insightful book, written by some of the leading academics in the field, advances research frontiers on intellectual property and copyright issues. Topics addressed include: peer-to-peer music file sharing, optimal fair use standards, the benefits of copyright collectives, copyright and market entry, alternatives to copyright, the impact of copyright on knowledge production, the proper balance between copyright and competition law, and the application of systematic principles to issues that arise at the periphery of intellectual property law – all with an eye toward economics.

General outline of the book

Edited by Lisa N. Takeyama, Wendy J. Gordon and Ruth Towse

Subjects: business and management, knowledge management, economics and finance, cultural economics, intellectual property, innovation and technology, intellectual property, knowledge management

Extract

The book begins with a chapter by Pamela Samuelson, a legal scholar famous for her pioneering work on the copyright issues raised by new information technologies. In Chapter 1, she addresses what may be perhaps the most fundamental question regarding economics and copyright: just what role does economics have in copyright law and policy? Samuelson suggests that economics has not thus far been as influential in intellectual property law and policymaking as it has been in other areas of economic regulation, such as antitrust. She offers several possible explanations for this, including for example, lack of economic expertise on the part of the relevant policymakers, and ‘the tight nexus between the copyright industry and the policymaking community’. Samuelson explains how economics does have an important and useful role to play in copyright law and policy – touching also on ways economics can be misused – and offers several examples and case studies. The chapter by Samuelson, in addressing some of the institutional and methodological difficulties that contribute to a law/economics divide, serves to introduce the book as a whole. The primary focus of the book’s succeeding sections is the application of economic tools and analysis to examine particular issues within copyright. They begin with considering the economics of copyright collectives. In Chapter 2, Arthur Snow and Richard Watt offer a novel view of the benefits of copyright collectives in their capacity to pool the risks of their members. While it is well-known that collective administration of...