Table of Contents

Handbook on East Asian Social Policy

Handbook on East Asian Social Policy

Elgar original reference

Edited by Misa Izuhara

Dramatic socio-economic transformations over the last two decades have brought social policy and social welfare issues to prominence in many East Asian societies. Since the 1990s and in response to national as well as global pressure, there have been substantial developments and reforms in social policy in the region but the development paths have been uneven. Until recently, comparative analysis of East Asian social policy tends to have focused on the established welfare state of Japan and the emerging welfare regimes of four ‘Tiger Economies’. Much of the recent debate indeed preceded China’s re-emergence onto the world economy. In this context, this Handbook brings China more fully into the contemporary social policy debates in East Asia. Organised around five themes from welfare state developments, to theories and methodologies, to current social policy issues, the Handbook presents original research from leading specialists in the fields, and provides a fresh and updated perspective to the study of social policy.

Introduction

Misa Izuhara

Subjects: asian studies, asian development, asian politics and policy, asian social policy, development studies, asian development, politics and public policy, asian politics, social policy and sociology, comparative social policy

Extract

Dramatic socio-economic transformation in East Asian societies over the last two decades has brought social policy and social welfare issues to prominence. Since the 1990s, in response to national as well as global pressure, there have been substantial developments and reforms in social policy in the region from Japan to South Korea, and to China, and such policy developments have been embedded in the particular economic context. Rapid economic growth in the region in the latter part of the twentieth century – for example, Japan’s post-war economic miracle followed by its bubble economy in the 1980s and the remarkable developments of the other East Asian newly industrialized countries (NICs) of Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan – has contributed to raise the profile and presence of East Asia upon the global stage. Despite the setback of the Asian Financial Crisis (AFC) of the late 1990s, the more recent re-emergence of China and India into the global economy has brought about the prediction that the twenty first century would be the ‘Asian century’ with its political, economic and cultural dominance in the world (see Kohli, Sharma and Sood, 2011Dramatic socio-economic transformation in East Asian societies over the last two decades has brought social policy and social welfare issues to prominence.