Redesigning Management Education and Research

Redesigning Management Education and Research

Challenging Proposals from European Scholars

Edited by Stephanie Dameron and Thomas Durand

The field of management education and research has become an industry of its own – an industry with fierce international competition in a global arena. Here, the authors argue that a series of mechanisms has led to mimicking and thus strategic convergence among business schools. The authors further argue that this has resulted in a loss of relevance and diversity of the management knowledge produced and taught in a multipolar world. They view this as counterproductive to business schools, students, firms, societies and other stakeholders, including scholars themselves.

Introduction: The Story in Short

Edited by Stephanie Dameron and Thomas Durand

Subjects: business and management, management education, management and universities, research methods in business and management, education, management and universities, management education, research methods, research methods in business and management

Extract

Management education and research crystallise some of the successes, failures and contradictions of our modern societies. On the one hand, the demand for training in management keeps growing and so do the expectations from stakeholders within and outside organisations to better understand how businesses emerge, grow, evolve and disappear and how these businesses may be run in various contexts. Enrolment at business schools is increasing throughout the world, and more research is conducted and published every year – with an explosion of the literature that makes it extremely difficult for both academics and practitioners to follow all that goes on in the field. This is taking place in a world economy that keeps growing despite some ups and downs, with international trade bound to develop further despite the limitations of the resources of our planet, and with entire regions of the globe reaching the income per capita that they had been dreaming of, hoping for a better life with access to mass consumption, better housing, health, education, travel and so on. In this sense, management education and research at business schools may be viewed as both benefiting from and fuelling the world economy. Business schools aim at providing (a) educated individuals trained to deal with the complexity of the task of leading ‘organised collective action’ and (b) new insights to improve the practice of management for a variety of forms of organisations in a variety of contexts. On the other hand, the success of business schools raises many disturbing questions. How...