Table of Contents

Research Handbook on Money Laundering

Research Handbook on Money Laundering

Elgar original reference

Edited by Brigitte Unger and Daan van der Linde

Although the practice of disguising the illicit origins of money dates back thousands of years, the concept of money laundering as a multidisciplinary topic with social, economic, political and regulatory implications has only gained prominence since the 1980s. This groundbreaking volume offers original, state-of-the-art research on the current money laundering debate and provides insightful predictions and recommendations for future developments in the field.

Chapter 30: Reporting duty for lawyers versus legal privilege – unresolved tension

Maaike Stouten and André Tilleman

Subjects: economics and finance, economic crime and corruption, law - academic, corruption and economic crime, politics and public policy, terrorism and security


The reporting duty pursuant to the EU AML/CTF legislation is precarious. Can lawyers who have a duty to secrecy be forced to report clients for money laundering or terrorist financing? Exceptions to the reporting duty in case of legal privilege are left, to some extent, to the EU Member States. This contribution shows that questions surrounding the AML/CTF reporting duty are not yet resolved, and seem to ask for a more harmonized approach of the legal privilege exemption in the Member States.

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