Migration Impact Assessment

Migration Impact Assessment

New Horizons

New Horizons in Regional Science series

Edited by Peter Nijkamp, Jacques Poot and Mediha Sahin

During the last few decades the world has experienced an unprecedented level of cross-border migration. While this has generated significant socio-economic gains for host countries, as well as sometimes for the countries of origin, the costs and benefits involved are unevenly distributed. Consequently, growing global population mobility is a hotly debated topic, both in the political arena and by the general public. Amidst a plethora of facts, opinions and emotions, the assessment of migration impacts must be grounded in a solid scientific evidence base. This analytical book outlines and applies a range of the scientific methods that are currently available in migration impact assessment (MIA). The book provides various North American and European case studies that quantify socio-economic consequences of migration for host societies and for immigrants themselves.

Preface

Edited by Peter Nijkamp, Jacques Poot and Mediha Sahin

Subjects: development studies, migration, economics and finance, regional economics, valuation, politics and public policy, migration, public policy, social policy and sociology, migration, urban and regional studies, migration, regional economics

Extract

During the last few decades the world has experienced an unprecedented level of cross-border migration. Arguably, we live in an ‘age of migration’ that is characterized by extensive spatial mobility of people, a development that runs parallel to international tourism or journey-from-home-to-work movements. Such developments are caused by an open space economy, by modern ICT developments, by the introduction of cheap and efficient transport systems, and by a combination of competition and global linkages. Migration has to be positioned against the background of the above structural megatrends, but also has its own intrinsic features that make it distinct from other mobility trends. International migration movements nowadays often mean a shift to different countries, economic systems and institutions. They may lead to enrichment in socio-economic and cultural terms for either the sending countries, or the receiving countries, or both. They may also lead to more efficiently operating local and national labour markets and hence increase local and national welfare. But this sunny picture is often overshadowed by dark clouds, as the value of migration is often disputed, while migrants’ behaviour and impacts in the host countries are often criticized or the source of heated debates. Consequently, there is a clear need for a solid, evidence-based scientific analysis of the pros and cons of cross-border migration in a receiving country at both national and local level. This present volume seeks to offer a variety of new tools and applications for ‘tracing and tracking’ the socio-economic consequences of international migration. It does so...