Table of Contents

Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Urban Economies

Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Urban Economies

Handbooks of Research Methods and Applications series

Edited by Peter Karl Kresl and Jaime Sobrino

In this timely Handbook, seventeen renowned contributors from Asia, the Americas and Europe provide chapters that deal with some of the most intriguing and important aspects of research methodologies on cities and urban economies.

Chapter 16: Analysing internal migration pathways in Mexico

Jaime Sobrino

Subjects: economics and finance, public sector economics, regional economics, urban economics, politics and public policy, public policy, research methods, research methods in economics, urban and regional studies, regional economics, regional studies, research methods in urban and regional studies, urban economics, urban studies


To date, there has been an important body of literature and research on the relationship between migration and the territorial distribution of population throughout the world, as well as between internal migration and national economic development. Research on internal migration has been carried out from the viewpoints of several different disciplines: demography, economics, geography, sociology, and anthropology. A fundamental division in that research has been as follows: “macro” contributions – which have attempted to analyse the interrelationships between migratory flows, on the one hand, and the economic, cultural, and environmental features of origin and destination points, and also income and human capital differentials between the two, on the other – and studies from a “micro” perspective, which have focused on the situation and decision-making processes of individuals and families regarding migration, as well as the role played by their age and life cycle in opportunities for movement and for evaluating destinations. In an intermediate position, we find research stressing migrants’ socio-demographic characteristics so as to concentrate on their selectivity and the effects of these flows on demographic, economic, and social structures at points of origin and destination.

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