Table of Contents

The Dissemination of Economic Ideas

The Dissemination of Economic Ideas

Edited by Heinz D. Kurz, Tamotsu Nishizawa and Keith Tribe

This highly illuminating book marks a significant stage in our growing understanding of how the development of national traditions of economic thought has been affected by both internal and external factors.

The Dissemination of Economic Ideas: Introduction

Heinz D. Kurz, Tamotsu Nishizawa and Keith Tribe

Subjects: economics and finance, economic psychology, history of economic thought

Extract

Heinz D. Kurz, Tamotsu Nishizawa and Keith Tribe1 In March 2009 a joint meeting of the Japanese and European Societies for the History of Economic Thought was held in Tokyo and Kyoto, dedicated to the theme of ‘The Dissemination of Economic Ideas’.2 This volume presents selected papers from that conference, marking a significant stage in our growing understanding of the manner in which the ebb and flow in the development of national traditions of economic thought has been affected by the interaction of internal and external factors. We should also note that the possibility of discussing the dissemination process in such a context was itself made possible by the existence of a European society which has over the past decade and a half provided a framework for regular meetings of scholars who are themselves also members of national bodies.3 While the subject matter of this collection reaches back to the seventeenth century, regular interchanges of the kind represented by the Tokyo and Kyoto meetings go back no more than 20 or 30 years. And so this book places an explicit agenda – study of the dissemination of economic ideas over a period of four centuries – within an implicit framework which is, relatively speaking, quite new. This introduction is directed to both of these issues, but begins necessarily from the intentions framing the March 2009 meetings.4 Consideration of the propagation and dissemination of economic ideas comes naturally to Japanese scholars, for the Meiji Restoration of 1867 inaugurated a period of rapid change...