Table of Contents

Innovation, Global Change and Territorial Resilience

Innovation, Global Change and Territorial Resilience

New Horizons in Regional Science series

Edited by Philip Cooke, Mario Davide Parrilli and José Luis Curbelo

Localized creativity, small high-tech entrepreneurship, related innovation platforms, social capital embedded in dynamically open territorial communities and context-specific though continuously upgrading policy platforms are all means to face new challenges and to promote increased absorptive capacity within local and national territories. The contributors illustrate that these capabilities are much needed in the current globalized economy as a path towards sustainability and for creating new opportunities for their inhabitants. They analyse the challenges and development prospects of local/regional production systems internally, across territories, and in terms of their potential and territorial connectivity which can help exploit opportunities for proactive policy actions. This is increasingly relevant in the current climate, in which the balanced allocation of resources and opportunities, particularly for SMEs, cannot be expected to be the automatic result of the working of the market.

Preface

Edited by Philip Cooke, Mario Davide Parrilli and José Luis Curbelo

Subjects: economics and finance, economics of innovation, industrial economics, regional economics, innovation and technology, economics of innovation, urban and regional studies, regional economics

Extract

In the current globalized economy a number of new challenges arise for local/regional economies as well as for broader national and community areas. In this context, territorial resilience is necessary and innovation represents the mechanism that may help to successfully sustain it. Indeed, innovation has become the critical driver for territorial development and competitiveness. The most advanced countries are those that invest the most significant percentage of their gross domestic product (GDP) in research and development (R&D) and other innovation activities. The globalization of markets has emphasized the need to respond quickly to such challenges, as large national economies have joined the international market on the basis of traditional cost advantages, but also on the basis of new advances made in technological and non-technological innovation. Many countries find themselves squeezed out of their former marketplaces. However, this situation not only creates threats and challenges, but also opens up opportunities that have to be exploited to create room for more balanced development between traditionally advanced economies, and transition, emerging and developing countries. It is a case of opening of new markets, but also potential for creating competent collaboration in research and development as well as in production and commercialization. As a result, the former market of 1–2 billion people in the advanced economies is getting too small; the new marketplace stretches well beyond that to incorporate a few more billion people who were previously left outside the production and consumption dynamics. In such a scenario nothing can be taken...