Table of Contents

Multi-Modal Competition and the Future of Mail

Multi-Modal Competition and the Future of Mail

Advances in Regulatory Economics series

Edited by Michael A. Crew and Paul R. Kleindorfer

This compilation of original papers selected from the 19th Conference on Postal and Delivery Economics and authored by an international cast of economists, lawyers, regulators and industry practitioners addresses perhaps the most significant problem that has ever faced the postal sector – electronic competition from information and communication technologies. This has increased significantly over the last few years with a consequent serious drop in mail volume.

Chapter 23: Understanding Consumer Preferences for Paper and Digital Marketing Channels

Kari Elkelä

Subjects: economics and finance, competition policy, public sector economics


Kari Elkelä† 57 1 INTRODUCTION Marketing is an essential part of the communications market. We encounter it both in the form of separate marketing messages and in many channels related to information and entertainment. The rapid development of mobile phones and Internet services is changing the character of marketing and challenging the traditionally strong paper channels. Numerous studies in many countries have been carried out targeted at only one or two new digital channels. However, an overall view of consumer preferences for alternative marketing channels, and the demographic and other factors influencing these, has yet to appear. Is paper marketing still the dominant form? How widely is digital marketing accepted? What are consumer preferences for each channel? Why are certain channels preferred by certain consumers? Answers to these questions are important both for marketing enterprises and for operators providing traditional and digital delivery services. This chapter presents a framework for analyzing these questions, together with some results based on survey data gathered over the last five years in Finland. Two quite large sets of quantitative cross-sectional data were used for this research. The change follow-up and segmentation data, which consisted of 1,180 responses, was collected in June 2010 (Elkelä, 2010). The channel preference explanation data, with 1,397 responses, was collected in October 2010 (Elkelä, 2011). Both sets of data are representative samples of Finns aged over 15 years. This research can also be viewed as following, enlarging on and deepening my earlier study ‘Paper or electronic?’ (Elkel...

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