Table of Contents

Creativity and Entrepreneurship

Creativity and Entrepreneurship

Changing Currents in Education and Public Life

Edited by Lynn Book and David Phillips

While creativity and entrepreneurship may appear to be unlikely allies, they are increasingly intersecting to produce economic and social value in new and exciting ways. This groundbreaking volume examines how creativity and entrepreneurship can be used in conjunction to foster positive change and innovation, particularly in areas such as higher education and sustainable global development.

Introduction: Beyond borders: Extending the relevance and impact of creative and entrepreneurial action

Edited by Lynn Book and David Phillips

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, management and universities, education, management and universities

Extract

The question What is creativity? defies singular definition. In this introductory chapter, we address its complex and diffuse nature, and show that its meaning and purpose depend on the disciplinary discourses with which it is aligned and the cultural domains in which it occurs. It takes form in human behavior as cognition and action; it can be located in objects, processes and systems; and it emerges in collaborative groups and virtual networks (Sawyer, 2003). It is full of contrasts, often requiring conflict stimulus, while also inducing empathic responses in both producers and receivers (Bannerman, 2007; Sternberg, 2007). Moreover this chapter demonstrates that high-order creative engagement pivots on transformation – of the individuals, objects and environments involved (Becker, 2009; Csikszentmihalyi, 1996; Sullivan, 2005). Creativity theorists have defined the term as ‘the ability to produce work that is novel (i.e., original, unexpected), high in quality, and appropriate (i.e., useful and meeting task constraints)’ (Sternberg et al., 2002). Public perceptions of creativity tend to narrowly define it as specialized behavior that results in a product or artifact unique to the arts and contingent on genetic predisposition, or talent. These and other creativity ‘myths’ (Sawyer, 2008) have the power to arrest the imagination of the artist and non-artist alike. Further, culturally constructed and socially accepted forms of creativity can hinder attempts to develop more encompassing ideas of what it can be (Csikszentmihalyi, 1996; Sternberg et al., 2006; Sternberg, 2007).