Table of Contents

Handbook on Transport and Development

Handbook on Transport and Development

Edited by Robin Hickman, Moshe Givoni, David Bonilla and David Banister

This Handbook provides an extensive overview of the relationships between transport and development. With 45 chapters from leading international authors, the book is organised in three main parts: urban structure and travel; transport and spatial impacts; and wider dimensions in transport and development. The chapters each present commentary on key issues within these themes, presenting the debate on the impacts of urban structure on travel, the impacts of transport investment on development, and social and cultural change on travel. A multitude of angles are considered – leaving the reader with a comprehensive and critical understanding of the field.

Chapter 28: Development and social policy: the role of transport in social development, in the UK context

Susan Kenyon

Subjects: development studies, development studies, economics and finance, environmental economics, transport, environment, environmental economics, transport, urban and regional studies, transport

Extract

This chapter considers the role of transport in social development in the UK. Theoretical and empirical evidence is presented to support the call for transport to be recognised as a social policy, both affecting and being affected by policies that promote social development. It is shown that transport creates a need for social policies; and that social policies create a need for transport. If these needs are not met, social policies will not succeed in their social development aims. Transport is shown to influence the success of both traditional and new social policies, with a particular focus upon education, demonstrating, through a case study, an unbreakable link between transport and social development. This link is so strong that transport must now be considered to be a social policy, if social development is to be furthered in the UK. The chapter is innovative in its call for transport policy to be recognised as social policy, with the commentary offering a new perspective on the influence of transport on social development in the UK. The chapter begins with a definition of development, before turning to define social policy. Next, there is discussion of transport and social policy. Two discourses are identified: the ‘too little mobility’ discourse and the ‘too much mobility’ discourse. The chapter then turns to a case study of education in the UK. The effects of transport on education are presented to illustrate the inextricable link between transport, social development and social policy.

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