Table of Contents

Handbook of Research on Employee Voice

Handbook of Research on Employee Voice

Elgar original reference

Edited by Adrian Wilkinson, Jimmy Donaghey, Tony Dundon and Richard B. Freeman

The term ‘employee voice’ refers to the ways and means through which employees can attempt to have a say and influence organizational issues that affect their work and the interests of managers and owners. The concept is distinct, but related to and often overlapping with issues such as participation, involvement and, more recently, engagement. This Handbook provides an up-to-date survey of the current research into employee voice, sets this research into context and sets a marker for future research in the area.

Chapter 11: Union voice

Sarah Kaine

Subjects: business and management, human resource management, organisational behaviour


This chapter will consider the purpose and form of union voice. It will chart the development of 'voice' as a means of describing union representation and explore the implications of changes to both labour market structures and the nature of the employment relationship for union voice. It will then examine the various levels at which union voice is expressed, and in doing so highlight the key differences between union voice and other forms of worker voice. Finally, it offers some observations about the possible future of union voice.

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