International Handbook on Diversity Management at Work

International Handbook on Diversity Management at Work

Second Edition Country Perspectives on Diversity and Equal Treatment

Elgar original reference

Edited by Alain Klarsfeld, Lize A.E. Booysen, Eddy Ng, Ian Roper and Ahu Tatli

The second edition of this important reference work provides important updates and new perspectives on the cases constituting the first edition, as well as including contributions from a number of new countries: Australia, Finland, Japan, New Zealand, Nigeria and Russia. Countries that have been updated and expanded are Austria, Canada, France, India, Italy, the Netherlands, South Africa, and the United Kingdom.

Introduction: equality and diversity in 14 countries - analysis and summary

Alain Klarsfeld, Lize A.E. Booysen, Eddy Ng, Ian Roper and Ahu Tatli

Subjects: business and management, diversity and management, gender and management, human resource management

Extract

The first edition of the International Handbook on Diversity Management at Work (Klarsfeld, 2010a) considered the practice of diversity management within the national contexts of 16 countries - Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, India, Italy, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Singapore, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the UK and the USA. This second edition provides updates on some of the original country selections and supplements these with a further series of country-specific overviews. New to this edition are Australia, Finland, Japan, New Zealand, Nigeria and Russia. Countries that have been updated and expanded are Austria, Canada, France, India, Italy, the Netherlands, South Africa and the UK. Historically, human resource management, when dealing with issues of equality and diversity, was concerned with the disparate activities of dealing with equity issues in pay systems, statutory employment regulation in relation to discrimination and of managing cross-cultural diversity when expatriate managers were sent to work overseas. One of the most significant effects of globalization has been a shift in the scope of diversity management into a much more interdependent and wide-ranging concept. The dynamics of labour markets around the world have led to far greater diversity of workforces and have therefore expanded the challenges to human resource managers in dealing with the consequences of these changes (Verma and He, 2010).