Table of Contents

Handbook of Research on Creativity

Handbook of Research on Creativity

Elgar original reference

Edited by Kerry Thomas and Janet Chan

In this timely work, creativity is not defined by an ideal, rather it encompasses a range of theories, functions, characteristics, processes, products and practices that are associated with the generation of novel and useful outcomes suited to particular social, cultural and political contexts. Chapters present original research by international scholars from a wide range of disciplines including history, sociology, psychology, philosophy, cultural studies, education, economics and interdisciplinary studies. Their research investigates creativity in diverse fields including art, creative industries, aesthetics, design, new media, music, arts education, science, engineering and technology.

Preface and acknowledgments

Edited by Kerry Thomas and Janet Chan

Subjects: business and management, organisation studies, innovation and technology, innovation policy

Extract

When we accepted Edward Elgar’s commission to put together a Handbook of Research on Creativity two years ago, we knew we were taking on a challenge, but it was only when we started work on the Handbook that we began to realize what a huge challenge it was. If a Handbook is ‘a book giving information such as facts on a particular subject or instructions for operating a machine’ (Oxford Dictionary) then this Handbook will disappoint many. Not only is it not a manual for how to do research on creativity, it is also light on ‘facts’ about research on creativity. This is because, as is pointed out in the Introduction and in the chapter ‘Researching creativity and creativity research’, creativity research in the early years of the 21st century is a dynamic field. While an increasing number of researchers are identifying with creativity research as a field of study, many more would gladly distance themselves from such an exercise, preferring to work within established disciplines such as psychology, sociology, history, philosophy, the arts, education and so on. Perhaps it is inevitable that any new area of research will not attract the interest of many scholars in established disciplines, but creativity is a particularly alluring although nebulous concept, a bit like beauty or success, which until recently has made it somewhat unsettling for researchers to spend any serious time on.