Table of Contents

International Handbook on Ecotourism

International Handbook on Ecotourism

Elgar original reference

Edited by Roy Ballantyne and Jan Packer

This Handbook brings together contributions from over forty international experts in the field of ecotourism. It provides a critical review and discussion of current issues and concepts – it challenges readers to consider the boundaries of what ecotourism is, and could be. The Handbook provides practical information regarding the business of ecotourism; insights into ecotourist behaviour and visitor experiences; and reflections on the practice of ecotourism in a range of different contexts.

Chapter 25: Winning hearts and minds through interpretation: walking the talk

Karen Hughes and Roy Ballantyne

Subjects: development studies, tourism, environment, ecological economics, environmental sociology, tourism, geography, tourism


Tourists are becoming increasingly sophisticated and well informed, and as a result, are searching for innovative, unusual and/or unique tourist experiences (Rodger & Calver, 2004; Shackley, 1996). This may in part account for the increasingly wide variety of environmental experiences and opportunities on offer – activities ranging from jungle treks, butterfly viewing and cross-country skiing to snorkelling with whale sharks, eating breakfast with orangutans, going on safari and ballooning over waterfalls. Many of these activities are accompanied by interpretation designed to give visitors an insight into the fauna, flora and/or culture being viewed. This interpretation can be delivered in a variety of ways, ranging from guided tours, re-enactments, audio talks and specialist presentations to signs, brochures, multi-media exhibits and interactive experiences. Regardless of delivery mode, interpretation aims to present information in a way that inspires visitors to learn about the particular topic, issue or event being interpreted. So what exactly is interpretation and how does it achieve these aims?

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information