Research Handbook on Economic Models of Law

Research Handbook on Economic Models of Law

Research Handbooks in Law and Economics series

Edited by Thomas J. Miceli and Matthew J. Baker

One of the great successes of the law and economics movement has been the use of economic models to explain the structure and function of broad areas of law. The original contributions to this volume epitomize that tradition, offering state-of-the-art research on the many facets of economic modeling in law.

Chapter 8: Litigation success functions

Jef De Mot

Subjects: economics and finance, history of economic thought, law and economics, methodology of economics, law - academic, law and economics


Law and economics scholars have traditionally focused more on the reasons for trial than on the trial itself. More recently however, some studies have paid more attention to the legal battle itself. These studies have analyzed the impact of legal rules on the expenditure decisions of the parties at trial and have examined how these effects may change some standard results of the literature. Many of these articles use an explicit function for the probability of a plaintiff victory.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information