Table of Contents

Handbook of Service Business

Handbook of Service Business

Management, Marketing, Innovation and Internationalisation

Research Handbooks in Business and Management series

Edited by John R. Bryson and Peter W. Daniels

Service business accounts for more than 75 per cent of the wealth and employment created in most developed market economies. The management and economics of service business is based around selling expertise, knowledge and experiences. This Handbook contributes to on-going debates about the nature of service business and the characteristics of service-led economies by exploring disciplinary perspectives on services, services and core business processes and the management of service business. A series of case studies are also provided. The volume pushes back the frontiers of current critical thinking about the role of service business by bringing together eminent scholars from economics, management, sociology, public policy, planning and geography.

Chapter 18: How has logistics come to exert such a key role in the performance of economies, society and policy making in the 21st century?

Andrew Potter and Robert Mason

Subjects: business and management, marketing, economics and finance, services, geography, economic geography, urban and regional studies, regional studies


Logistics has become one of the most progressive and important service industries in the 21st century’s global economy. At a basic operational level logistics directly provides the physical glue of commerce, ensuring goods and services have time and place utility. Beyond this, however, the logistics industry has risen in strategic importance and can be seen as a critical component of competitive advantage in many current enterprises, providing crucial links in the chain of supply. In modern internationally competitive supply chains, the logistics ‘cog’ must be consistently robust if supply chain management (SCM) practices are to be pursued with minimal buffering inventory levels. Moreover, in the new digital age logistics is also about exploiting value from the wider industrial network, identifying and realising network and multichannel synergies so that the very best service value is provided for customers of logistics services.

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