Infrastructure for Asian Connectivity

Infrastructure for Asian Connectivity

ADBI series on Asian Economic Integration and Cooperation

Edited by Biswa Nath Bhattacharyay, Masahiro Kawai and Rajat M. Nag

This book addresses the prospects and challenges concerning both soft and hard infrastructure development in Asia and provides a framework for achieving Asian connectivity through regional infrastructure cooperation towards a seamless Asia.

Chapter 2: Estimating demand for infrastructure, 2010–2020

Biswa Nath Bhattacharyay

Subjects: asian studies, asian economics, asian geography, development studies, development economics, economics and finance, asian economics, development economics, regional economics, urban and regional studies, regional economics


Infrastructure plays a key role in promoting and sustaining rapid economic growth. Properly designed infrastructure can also make growth more inclusive by sharing its benefits with poorer groups and communities, especially by connecting remote areas and small and landlocked countries to major business centers. Studies in several developing Asian countries illustrate how infrastructure, particularly road transport and electricity, help in reducing poverty (ADB et al. 2005). Even if the Asia-Pacific region has witnessed progress in infrastructure development, the growth of infrastructure lags behind its economic growth, and also behind international standards of infrastructure quantity and quality. Inadequate infrastructure can hamper the potential economic growth of Asian countries, weaken their international competitiveness and adversely affect their poverty reduction efforts. Moreover, it is note worthy to stress that the Asia-Pacific region accounts for about 60 percent of the world’s population and 30 percent of the world’s total land area, with nearly two-thirds of the world’s poor found in developing Asia (ADB 2007).

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