Exploring Transgenerational Entrepreneurship

Exploring Transgenerational Entrepreneurship

The Role of Resources and Capabilities

The Successful Transgenerational Entrepreneurship Practices series

Edited by Pramodita Sharma, Philipp Sieger, Robert S. Nason, Ana Cristina Gonzalez L. and Kavil Ramachandran

Transgenerational entrepreneurship, as a discipline, examines the processes, resources and capabilities that allow family enterprises to create social and economic value over time in order to succeed beyond the first generation of business owners. While tangible resources such as financial and physical capital are certainly important factors in the long-term success of a family-run business, this book focuses specifically on the role of intangible resources and capabilities, which are less easily quantifiable but equally vital.

Chapter 9: Reputation for what? Different types of reputation and their effect on portfolio entrepreneurship activities

Eric Clinton, Robert S. Nason and Philipp Sieger

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, family business


In 1932, Ryan Smith Senior began his working life at the age of 16 in partnership with his brother delivering coal, sand and gravel in Dublin city, Ireland. From these humble beginnings emerged Tarastone Limited, which quarried and supplied stones to the construction industry. By 1961, Tarastone had expanded overseas and its success continued through its merger with Infrastructure Development Limited in 1970 to form Infrastructure Development Holdings (IDH) plc. Frustrated by the restrictions of a large public company, Ryan resigned his position as chief executive officer (CEO) of IDH in 1974. In 1978, Ryan Smith Senior started MLS. The first infrastructure project of this company was the construction of the South Link Bridge across the River Liffey, linking north and south Dublin. This project was developed and built in conjunction with the Irish government as a public–private partnership (PPP).

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