Table of Contents

Handbook on the Experience Economy

Handbook on the Experience Economy

Elgar original reference

Edited by Jon Sundbo and Flemming Sørensen

This illuminating Handbook presents the state-of-the-art in the scientific field of experience economy studies. It offers a rich and varied collection of contributions that discuss different issues of crucial importance for our understanding of the experience economy. Each chapter reflects diverse scientific viewpoints from disciplines including management, mainstream economics and sociology to provide a comprehensive overview.

Chapter 12: Innovation in the experience sector

Jon Sundbo, Flemming Sørensen and Lars Fuglsang

Subjects: business and management, marketing, development studies, tourism, economics and finance, cultural economics, industrial economics, services, social policy and sociology, sociology and sociological theory


We might suppose that innovation in the experience sector is as important as in any other but that the sector has its own innovation logic. However, given the newness of the topic little research has been undertaken in this area. This chapter presents the first investigation of innovation in the experience sector that is based on a general survey. When the service sector was discovered as a specific phenomenon (for example, Gadrey et al., 1993; Sundbo, 1998; Gallouj, 2002), the question of whether this newly defined sector innovates and whether it does so in the same way as the old sector became relevant (for example, does the service sector innovate in the same way as the manufacturing sector?). When we investigate the experience sector, we may ask the same questions: do experience firms innovate and, if so, do they do so in the same way as service and manufacturing firms? To answer these questions requires comprehensive research that must be carried out in the future. However, we might start our investigation by asking how much firms in the experience sector innovate compared to other sectors, and if the characteristics of innovation are similar to or different from those of other sectors.

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