Innovation and Creativity

Innovation and Creativity

Pillars of the Future Global Economy

Edited by Filip De Beule and Ysabel Nauwelaerts

This book brings together different insights into the importance of innovation and creativity to build competitiveness in the European industry and society from different angles.

Chapter 5: Which Portuguese firms are more innovative? The importance of multinationals and exporters

Armando Silva, Oscar Afonso and Ana Paula Africano

Subjects: business and management, international business, organisational innovation, innovation and technology, organisational innovation


Since different countries perform differently with respect to innovation ability, and given that countries’ performances mainly reflect firms’ innovation abilities, several related questions arise: (1) which countries are most innovative? (2) which firms are most innovative? (3) is there any connection between firms´ innovativeness and their level of global engagement? The firm’s innovation level is related to: (1) firms’ specific aspects (for example, size, managerial initiative or managerial risk assumption); (2) time-specific factors; (3) technological characteristics of the sectors that firms belong to; (4) market concentration level; and (5) market orientation (for example, domestic or international). Some models (for example, Jones, 2002) assume that the stock of knowledge is a public good, equally and freely available to all firms worldwide; in contrast, Grossman and Helpman (1991) and Parente and Prescott (1994) present models in which firms have to face costs and difficulties in adopting new technological knowledge. Such barriers differ across time and countries, suggesting that external trade may influence firms´ ability to adopt and adapt existing technological knowledge. Nowadays it is common to accept that the existing stock of knowledge is quite differently appropriated and benefited from by various firms.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information