Asian Security and the Rise of China

Asian Security and the Rise of China

International Relations in an Age of Volatility

David Martin Jones, Nicholas Khoo and M. L.R. Smith

East Asia is without question a region of huge economic, political and security significance. Asian Security and the Rise of China offers a comprehensive overview and assessment of the international politics of the Asia-Pacific since the end of the Cold War, seeking to address the overarching question of how we can most convincingly explain the central dynamics of Asia’s international relations. Via a realist perspective on the dynamics and frictions associated with accommodating the rise of powerful states, this timely book addresses the core issue in contemporary Asian politics: the rise of China.


David Martin Jones, Nicholas Khoo and M. L.R. Smith

Subjects: asian studies, asian politics and policy, politics and public policy, asian politics, international relations, terrorism and security


Reflecting on the current state of international relations, both in practical and theoretical terms, a student of world affairs will be struck by the number of works – including this one – that take the rise of China and the inexorable movement of power to the East as the standard trope of the times. This volume has considered the consequences of such a power shift. It has examined the impact of China’s growing economic and political strength upon relations with the United States, which China appears to be challenging for greater regional and global influence; the degree to which this engenders concerns among other powers, especially in Northeast and Southeast Asia; and the repercussions this has for regional institutions like ASEAN, and on somewhat peripheral middle-powers like Australia. As the final chapter noted, the implications of China’s rise have, since 2008, played out against the drama of the Northern financial crisis that underscores the relative decline of the once dominant West and the seemingly relentless rise to prominence of a New Asian Hemisphere.

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