Regulating Transport in Europe

Regulating Transport in Europe

Edited by Mattias Finger and Torben Holvad

This book concerns the regulation of transport within a European context, covering air, inland waterways, rail, road passenger and freight, urban public transport, and short sea shipping. All these sectors have experienced substantial changes over the last two decades, in terms of ownership, competition and liberalisation, and the book explores the main transformations and their impacts. The authors address these issues, with a specific focus on the effects of the organisation and regulation of transport systems on their performance. They also provide timely policy recommendations, including possible European future policy initiatives.

Chapter 7: Inland waterways

Tilman Erich Platz and Kees Ruijgrok

Subjects: economics and finance, transport, environment, transport, politics and public policy, public policy, regulation and governance, urban and regional studies, transport


Inland navigation is a specific mode of transport that is perfectly suitable for bulk transport and container transport, especially on medium and long distances (more than 100 km). In particular, the large rivers in Europe and the canals, which for the large part were built in the nineteenth century, are perfectly fitted for this mode of transport. In Figure 7.1 the freight volumes in European Union (EU) member countries in 2009 are indicated by country of origin, demonstrating that the vast majority of inland navigation in Europe takes place in four countries – the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium and France. This picture shows that the Rhine Scheldt estuary is especially popular for inland navigation. Almost 30 per cent of the containers and the majority of coal and ore that is shipped from Rotterdam to the hinterland use this mode of transport.

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