Table of Contents

How Entrepreneurs do What they do

How Entrepreneurs do What they do

Case Studies in Knowledge Intensive Entrepreneurship

Edited by Maureen McKelvey and Astrid Heidemann Lassen

How Entrepreneurs Do What They Do presents 13 case studies of knowledge intensive entrepreneurship. The book focuses on ‘doing’, in essence, what happens when entrepreneurs are engaging practically in venture creation processes.

Chapter 1: Introduction

Maureen McKelvey and Astrid Heidemann Lassen

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, knowledge management, organisational innovation, innovation and technology, knowledge management, organisational innovation

Extract

How Entrepreneurs Do What They Do presents 13 case studies of knowledge intensive entrepreneurship. The book focuses on what we call ‘doing’, meaning what happens when entrepreneurs are engaging practically in venture creation processes. The case studies cover a broad range of different types of firms, in different sectors and distributed around the globe. The reason being that this type of entrepreneurship can be found in many sectors and countries. The cases range from low-tech industries like food, to design firms like advertising, through service firms like software, and also high-tech sectors like biotechnology and pharmaceuticals. The cases are grouped into the broad headings of ‘Transversal technologies, engineering and software’, ‘Lifestyle technologies’ and ‘Human health care and food’. These cases as well as a companion conceptual book focus on knowledge intensive entrepreneurship, which is shortened to KIE. They describe and define KIE as a particular type of start-up venture and phenomena. Their business models and organizational forms are particularly dependent upon the intersection of different types of knowledge, including three types discussed in the cases. They include (1) the scientific, technological and creative knowledge, which helps produce novel ideas; (2) the market knowledge, which relates to an understanding of customers and potential markets and (3) the business knowledge, which is related to running the venture and firm. Given the level of novelty involved, the market often needs to be ‘created’ rather than already existing. Entrepreneurship can refer to both the persons and the phenomena, so this book uses some consistent definitions.