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Strategies for Sustainable Technologies and Innovations

Strategies for Sustainable Technologies and Innovations

Edited by John R. McIntyre, Silvester Ivanaj and Vera Ivanaj

Expert contributions examine the contextual factors that affect implementation of more sustainable technology and innovation practices, offering a number of empirical methodologies to describe and explain these multidimensional influences. What emerges is a compelling argument in favor of balanced strategies that merge profitability concerns with ecological consciousness, allowing for controlled sustainable development and stable, long-term economic success. Discussion of companies in both developed and emerging countries makes this book useful on a truly global scale.

Chapter 5: Codes of conduct and other multilateral control systems for multinationals: has the time come – again?

Tagi Sagafi-nejad

Subjects: business and management, corporate social responsibility, management and sustainability, organisational innovation, environment, environmental management, innovation and technology, organisational innovation


This chapter traces the evolving relationship between multinational enterprises (MNEs) or transnational corporations (TNCs) and governments from the 1970s – when a protracted exercise under United Nations (UN) auspices to establish a code of conduct for MNEs was ultimately abandoned, through the 1980s when an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) initiative to establish a multilateral agreement on investments was likewise given up. At the dawn of the twenty-first century, and especially after the 2008 global financial crisis, the need for multilateral instruments to delineate boundaries and establish rules of engagement for MNEs and nation-states is once again apparent. What can be learned from earlier attempts to establish such rules? Has the time indeed come for promulgating some form of international accord concerning the entire gamut of nation-states’ relations with these enterprises?

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