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Handbook on the Entrepreneurial University

Handbook on the Entrepreneurial University

Elgar original reference

Edited by Alain Fayolle and Dana T. Redford

This insightful Handbook offers a lens through which to view entrepreneurship strategy for higher education institutions, as it becomes increasingly necessary for universities to consider changing their strategies, culture and practices to become more entrepreneurial.

Chapter 6: University entrepreneurship education in Tanzania: introducing entrepreneurship education in a context of transition

Ernest Samwel Mwasalwiba, Peter Groenewegen and Ingrid Wakkee

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, management education, management and universities, education, management and universities, management education


In Africa, the education of entrepreneurial graduates is equated with the future prosperity of the nation (Kenway et al., 2004; Morley et al., 2009). This purported economic role of entrepreneurs in Africa (Bigsten and Sˆderbom, 2006) and the apparent link between an entrepreneurís level of education and the quality of business innovation, growth and success increased the demand for entrepreneurship education (Robinson and Sexton, 1994; Kuzilwa, 2005). In Tanzania, the increase in the number of enterprising graduates thus has been a major policy priority (Kaijage, 2001; Kristiansen, 2001; Wedgwood, 2007). Yet, surprisingly, self-employment among graduates has recently been reported to be falling (Al-Samarrai and Bennell, 2003; Mukyanuzi, 2003). Therefore, the conundrum of the effectiveness of teaching entrepreneurship in this specific context provides an interesting focus. This study has two aims. First, it aims at understanding the steps in the process of entrepreneurship education and the need for more entrepreneurial universities that might lead to an increase in high-value entrepreneurial activities in developing countries. Second, it extends instructional design theories to the domain of entrepreneurship education, thereby answering the call to exploit already developed and empirically established educational theories to the field of entrepreneurship education (BÈchard and GrÈgoire, 2005).

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