Moving Towards Low Carbon Mobility

Moving Towards Low Carbon Mobility

Edited by Moshe Givoni and David Banister

The transport sector has been singularly unsuccessful in becoming low carbon and less resource intensive. This book takes an innovative and holistic social, cultural and behavioural perspective, as well as covering the more conventional economic and technological dimensions, to provide a more complete understanding of the mobility and transport system and its progress towards high carbon mobility.

Chapter 12: Mobility as a complex system: key elements and interactions

James Macmillen

Subjects: economics and finance, environmental economics, transport, environment, climate change, environmental economics, transport, urban and regional studies, transport


The preceding ten chapters have each offered a series of compelling insights into various facets of contemporary mobility. Quite clearly, these various aspects of transport and mobility warrant detailed investigation and the production of specific knowledge surrounding their nature and evolution. Such are their details and uncertainties, academic research quite rightly attends to their individual issues and circumstances. For example, entire academic careers are focused on the nuances and complexities of transport governance within particular countries or at particular jurisdictional scales, and similar professional effort and expertise is directed at understanding the dynamics of biofuel markets and processes of urbanization in the Global South. This is quite necessary, for without the detailed expert knowledge produced by such specialist endeavours we would not have the requisite information required to be able to support societal understanding of transport and mobility more broadly, and importantly, we would not be able to pursue informed, evidence-based policy-making which is critical in shifting contemporary mobility systems onto a more sustainable path.

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