Globalisation, Economic Transition and the Environment

Globalisation, Economic Transition and the Environment

Forging a Path to Sustainable Development

Edited by Philip Lawn

This book focuses on three critical issues pertaining to the broader goal of sustainable development – namely, the degenerative forces of globalisation, ecological sustainability requirements, and how best to negotiate the economic transition process.

Chapter 2: Globalisation versus internationalisation, and four reasons why internationalisation is better

Herman Daly

Subjects: development studies, development economics, economics and finance, development economics, environment, ecological economics


This chapter has three parts. Firstly, I distinguish two concepts often confused – namely internationalisation versus globalisation. Secondly, I consider four negative consequences of globalisation that, to my mind, constitute four good reasons for rejecting globalisation and for accepting internationalisation as the model to follow. Thirdly, I consider the two most common objections to the case I have made against globalisation (or for internationalisation), and offer a refutation of each.

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