Table of Contents

The International Handbook on Gender, Migration and Transnationalism

The International Handbook on Gender, Migration and Transnationalism

Global and Development Perspectives

International Handbooks on Gender series

Edited by Laura Oso and Natalia Ribas Mateos

The International Handbook on Gender, Migration and Transnationalism represents a state-of-the-art review of the critical importance of the links between gender and migration in a globalising world. It draws on original, largely field-based contributions by authors across a range of disciplinary provenances worldwide.

Chapter 2: Gender and international migration: globalization, development and governance

Lourdes Benería, Carmen Diana Deere and Naila Kabeer

Subjects: development studies, development economics, family and gender policy, migration, economics and finance, development economics, geography, human geography, politics and public policy, migration, social policy and sociology, family and gender policy, migration, urban and regional studies, migration


Since the late 1980s, international migration has been one of the most debated of the diverse processes through which globalization has taken place. With an estimated 210 million people living outside their country of origin (ILO , 2010), international migration has touched the lives of almost everyone in both the sending and receiving countries of the Global South and the Global North. It has also generated major tensions in politics and policies that have, in turn, affected the ways in which migration has been experienced by different social groups and by men and women. From a gender perspective, we have witnessed the feminization of most migration flows, especially since the 1990s, with profound transformations in the structure of families and gender roles in the international division of labour. Sociologists and anthropologists provided some of the initial studies on international migration from a gender perspective (Ehrenreich and Hochschild, 2002; Parreñas, 2005; Herrera, 2006).Economists have subsequently contributed to the multi-and interdisciplinary character of these studies (Benería, 2008; Pérez Orozco, 2009; Lyberaki, 2011).

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