Table of Contents

The International Handbook on Gender, Migration and Transnationalism

The International Handbook on Gender, Migration and Transnationalism

Global and Development Perspectives

International Handbooks on Gender series

Edited by Laura Oso and Natalia Ribas Mateos

The International Handbook on Gender, Migration and Transnationalism represents a state-of-the-art review of the critical importance of the links between gender and migration in a globalising world. It draws on original, largely field-based contributions by authors across a range of disciplinary provenances worldwide.

Chapter 11: Women, gender, transnational migrations and mobility: focus on research in France

Christine Catarino and Mirjana Morokvasic

Subjects: development studies, development economics, family and gender policy, migration, economics and finance, development economics, geography, human geography, politics and public policy, migration, social policy and sociology, family and gender policy, migration, urban and regional studies, migration


This chapter provides a brief overview of the literature in France focusing on gender and women in migration since the beginning of the 1990s. The time span covered corresponds to a turning point and a new phase in the European migration landscape triggered by the end of the bipolar world, its subsequent European enlargement, increasing globalization, transnationalization and the feminization of migratory flows. In order to avoid being trapped in the discourse on ‘rethinking migration’, on ‘new trends’ and ‘discoveries’, we cannot ignore the production of knowledge which has shaped the current highly interesting and multifaceted debate. The next section addresses the debates preceding the period we are focusing on, namely from the 1970s onwards. The subsequent sections will provide an overview of selected issues and trends in research. In spite of the diversity of origins, profiles and patterns of migration, paradoxically there is a persistence in stereotyping women as ‘passive victims’.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information