Values, Payments and Institutions for Ecosystem Management

Values, Payments and Institutions for Ecosystem Management

A Developing Country Perspective

Edited by Pushpam Kumar and Ibrahim Thiaw

Using a selection of authoritative and original contributions, this timely book explores the uncertainty surrounding the impact of decisions undertaken to manage ecosystem services worldwide. Invariably, the policies designed and implemented to manage forests, wetlands, and marine and coastal environments often involve conflicts of interest between various stakeholders. This has added an additional layer of complexity in the context of developing countries where institutions and governance are weak or absent. Economic valuation and the subsequent design of innovative response tools such as payment for ecosystem services (PES) have the potential to offer far greater transparency. In the case of LDCs, the identification of suitable institutions for executing these tools is also of vital importance.

Chapter 11: How ecosystem-based restoration can yield a double dividend of adaptation to climate change and enhancement of ecosystem services

James Blignaut

Subjects: development studies, development economics, economics and finance, development economics, environmental economics, environment, ecological economics, environmental economics, management natural resources, valuation


Climate change affects most if not all aspects of human society, but so does poverty and environmental degradation. An obvious question is whether climate change policy can be designed in such a way that it also addresses the ills of poverty and environmental degradation. This question has been the topic of various discussion groups, one of which led to the so-called Hartwell Paper which, among other things, states: The [Hartwell] Paper therefore proposes that the organising principle of our effort should be the raising up of human dignity via three overarching objectives: ensuring energy access for all; ensuring that we develop in a manner that does not undermine the essential functioning of the Earth system; ensuring that our societies are adequately equipped to withstand the risks and dangers that come from all the vagaries of climate, whatever their cause may be (LSE/ISIS 2010: 5).

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