Comic Art, Creativity and the Law

Comic Art, Creativity and the Law

Elgar Law and Entrepreneurship series

Marc H. Greenberg

The creation of works of comic art, including graphic novels, comic books, cartoons and comic strips, and political cartoons, is affected, and at times limited, by a diverse array of laws, ranging from copyright law to free speech laws. This book examines how this intersection affects the creative process, and proposes approaches that encourage, rather than limit, that process in the comic art genre. Attention to the role comic art occupies in popular culture, and how the law responds to that role, is also analyzed.

PART I: Introduction

Marc H. Greenberg

Subjects: law - academic, information and media law, intellectual property law

Extract

The comic art form, whose hallmark is the telling of stories via a combination of text, dialogue and graphic art in a sequence, usually of panels, is one of the oldest and most popular forms of art in the world. In its most traditional mode, as comic books and graphic novels, it is a popular form of literature, and also provides the storyboards and scripts for blockbuster motion pictures, top-rated television shows, and a dizzying array of merchandise. More so than purely textual literary works, comic art works transcend geographic barriers, and are often used to communicate cultural values and social mores, as well as political messages, on a global basis.