Necessity Entrepreneurs

Necessity Entrepreneurs

Microenterprise Education and Economic Development

Edited by Jeremi Brewer and Stephen W. Gibson

Necessity entrepreneurs, in developing countries, are individuals who start small enterprises out of necessity. While they range from street sellers to educated hopefuls with little access to formal employment, the one thing that unites them is the need to survive. This volume is the first-known compilation of theories contributed by international scholars who have worked together to establish a theory-based discourse on necessity entrepreneurship, micro-enterprise education, and long-term economic development.

Chapter 7: Entrepreneurial intentions of nascent entrepreneurs motivated out of necessity

Wendy A. Lindsay

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, family business, development studies, social entrepreneurship


Developing countries represent the majority of countries in the world; 160 of the 192 listed United Nations member countries are classified by the International Monetary Fund (2011) as 'developing countries'. Developing countries are often characterized by extremes in wealth with significant proportions of the populations living in abject poverty - many in urban areas - while small concentrated proportions enjoy affluence (Massey, 1996; Luiz, 2006). Wealth extremes can contribute to economic and political instability and ultimately, if left unchecked, can lead to civil unrest and the destabilizing of regions as the effects of the unrest spread (Massey, 1996; Luiz, 2006; Arat, 2003). Thus, it is in the best interests of developed countries to assist in reducing poverty and to assist in the economic development of developing countries (Massey, 1996; Luiz, 2006; Arat, 2003).

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information