How to Get Published in the Best Entrepreneurship Journals

How to Get Published in the Best Entrepreneurship Journals

A Guide to Steer Your Academic Career

Edited by Alain Fayolle and Mike Wright

Competition to publish in the top journals is fierce. This book provides entrepreneurship researchers with relevant material and insights to support them in their efforts to publish their research in the most prestigious entrepreneurship outlets.

Chapter 3: The review process

Mike Wright

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, research methods in business and management

Extract

While most authors probably have an outline understanding of the journal review process, some of the details, such as how editors make decisions about whether to accept or reject a paper and how they select reviewers, may be less clear. Similarly, appropriate ways to respond to reviewers may be less well understood. In this chapter I discuss the stages in the review process from submission through review to final acceptance. It is also important for authors to understand the perspective of the editors and the reviewers both in preparing an article for submission and in revising a paper. Accordingly, the last section of the chapter spends some time discussing these aspects. The general decision-making process for articles submitted to a journal is as shown in Figure 3.1. The figure indicates the various stages that an article can go through as well as the range of decisions available. Essentially, there are four stages in the decision process. First, editors take an initial decision whether to send an article out to review or not. Second, having sent an article out for review and received reviewersí reports, the editor decides whether to progress the paper further or not. Third, where a decision is taken to ask for an article to be revised, the editor, having asked for a further round of reviews on the revised paper, decides whether to progress the article further or not. This stage may involve several iterations.

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