The Challenge of Local Government Size

The Challenge of Local Government Size

Theoretical Perspectives, International Experience and Policy Reform

Studies in Fiscal Federalism and State–local Finance series

Edited by Santiago Lago-Peñas and Jorge Martinez-Vazquez

Expert contributors in economics and political science offer a comprehensive breakdown of the issue of local jurisdiction fragmentation and provide recommendations for successful policy reform. Topics discussed include economies of scale, the costs and benefits of voluntary and forced amalgamation programs, the correlation between government size and corruption, privatization, and inter-municipal cooperation. A combination of theory and empirical evidence provides depth and makes this book an invaluable addition to the literature.

Chapter 3: Small is different: size, political representation and governance

Nicholas Charron, José Fernández-Albertos and Victor Lapuente

Subjects: economics and finance, public sector economics, politics and public policy, public policy


In the theoretical literature on government design, few variables have received more attention than the size of the polity. Since Plato’s prediction that the optimal size of a political unit should be 5040 free citizens, the list of thinkers concerned about state size has included Aristotle, Montesquieu, Rousseau, and many of the founding fathers, among others. One of the fathers of modern political science, Robert Dahl, devoted great attention to what he called the elemental question of what is the appropriate unit for a democratic political system . . . Among the vast number of theoretically possible ways of dividing up the inhabitants of this globe into more or less separate political systems, . . . are there any principles that instruct us as to how one ought to bound some particular collection of people, in order that they may rule themselves? (Dahl 1967: 953)

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