Table of Contents

Corruption, Grabbing and Development

Corruption, Grabbing and Development

Real World Challenges

Edited by Tina Søreide and Aled Williams

All societies develop their own norms about what is fair behaviour and what is not. Violations of these norms, including acts of corruption, can collectively be described as forms of ‘grabbing’. This unique volume addresses how grabbing hinders development at the sector level and in state administration. The contributors – researchers and practitioners who work on the ground in developing countries – present empirical data on the mechanisms at play and describe different types of unethical practices.

Chapter 15: Don't rock the boat: Norway's difficulties in dealing with corruption in development aid

Eirik G. Jansen

Subjects: development studies, development studies, economics and finance, development economics, economic crime and corruption, law - academic, corruption and economic crime, politics and public policy, public policy

Extract

This chapter addresses some of the constraints Norway faces when dealing with corruption in development aid programmes. The issue will be described and analysed in relation to one particular programme, the Management of Natural Resources Programme (MNRP) in Tanzania that Norway supported from 1994 to 2006 with NOK†300†million. An evaluation of MNRP (Cooksey et al., 2006), followed by a detailed forensic audit (Andresen and Bhattbhatt, 2007, 2008), revealed comprehensive and systemic corruption in the programme. The Norwegian governmentís response was directed primarily at the role of the government of Tanzania in the programme. How Norway as a donor dealt with the corruption in the MNRP and the framework within which this happened has been left largely unaddressed. The chapter focuses particularly on the role of the Norwegian Embassy in Dar es Salaam in the management of MNRP and how the management and corruption in the programme was handled. I have first-hand knowledge about the way this was done as I was the programme officer at the Embassy for MNRP from 2003ñ07. After 2007, I closely followed how the Norwegian Embassy in Dar es Salaam and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) in Oslo have handled MNRP after the corruption was documented.

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