Entrepreneurship Programs and the Modern University

Entrepreneurship Programs and the Modern University

Michael H. Morris, Donald F. Kuratko and Jeffrey R. Cornwall

After tracing the evolution of entrepreneurship within institutions of higher learning, the authors explore the key elements that constitute a comprehensive entrepreneurship program. Best practices at leading universities and differing kinds of academic environments are highlighted. They examine multiple aspects of program management and infrastructure, including curriculum and degree program development, where entrepreneurship is administratively housed, how it is organized, and approaches to staffing and resource acquisition.

Chapter 11: Study-abroad programs in entrepreneurship

Michael H. Morris, Donald F. Kuratko and Jeffrey R. Cornwall

Subjects: business and management, entrepreneurship, management education, management and universities


In its survey of entrepreneurial activities in 54 countries, the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor estimates that there are over 400 million entrepreneurial ventures (Kelley et al., 2012). The entrepreneurial revolution is a global one. And many of these ventures are active in the global market place. Yet, in spite of the sizable number of entrepreneurs to be found in the US, small businesses in the US lag behind their counterparts in other countries in terms of international engagement. For example, the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) reports that while 31percent of exports from the European Union are generated by small and medium enterprises, only 13 percent of US exports come from small and medium enterprises. And government data find that only 1 percent of US small businesses export. Many factors affect the propensity of business owners to seek customers in other countries. Certainly regulatory and financial barriers play a part, but small businesses in any country face those challenges.

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