Financial Crime and Gambling in a Virtual World

Financial Crime and Gambling in a Virtual World

A New Frontier in Cybercrime

Clare Chambers-Jones and Henry Hillman

In this unique book, the authors examine the relationship between real world legislation and new advancements in technology, showing how this can lead to loopholes in legislative protection. They draw on empirical research to highlight the jurisprudential issues relating to economic internet crime and digital currencies.

Chapter 2: Cybercrime critical literature review

Clare Chambers-Jones and Henry Hillman

Subjects: economics and finance, economic crime and corruption, law - academic, corruption and economic crime, criminal law and justice, finance and banking law, internet and technology law


Gatto has stated that ‘the slowly evolving legal jurisprudence in this area is lagging behind the rapidly advancing use of gamification’. To ascertain the extent to which this is a true statement within virtual worlds and online games, a critical literature review is undertaken below. The literature review examines the nature of cybercrime, from the definitions of cybercrime to the interpretation of what cybercrime means as a discipline within law and society. The chapter also examines the law enforcement agencies that police cybercrime and how the poor definition of cybercrime hinders their work. The chapter looks at different themes within cybercrime and provides a comprehensive review of the academic literature in the area, thus underpinning the empirical work analysed throughout the book. Cybercrime, virtual gambling and the law surrounding virtual worlds needs to be taken seriously. With the growth of virtual worlds spreading into commerce, finance and more general society it is important to strike a balance between regulating and oppressing the freedom of the Internet. However, it is clear that ‘[c]riminals and terrorists have spotted that the Internet is full of possibilities; and needless to say, have exploited it’.

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