Paying the Polluter

Paying the Polluter

Environmentally Harmful Subsidies and their Reform

Edited by Frans H. Oosterhuis and Patrick ten Brink

Pledges to reform environmentally harmful subsidies (EHS) have increased over the past few years, at both global and national levels. Paying the Polluter addresses the most important issues to be considered when embarking upon these necessary reforms.

Chapter 13: The way forward: reforming EHS in the transition to a green economy

Patrick ten Brink, Sirini Withana and Frans Oosterhuis

Subjects: environment, environmental economics, environmental politics and policy, politics and public policy, environmental governance and regulation, environmental politics and policy


There is a growing list of commitments to reform environmental harmful subsidies from the global to the local level. Although public statements of the urgency for subsidy reform and declarations of commitment to such reforms have been increasing, progress to date has been relatively slight, with several notable exceptions. There is a new consensus that the conditions necessary for subsidy reform are increasingly aligned - a growing realization of resource scarcity, an appreciation of environmental and health impacts and a need for fiscal consolidation - creating a range of windows of opportunity between now and 2020 for EHS reform. This chapter presents guidelines to support countries in the identification of EHS, prioritization for reform and principles to guide the reform process. Subsidies are an integral part of political economy and current weaknesses in their design are undermining the potential for the transition to a green economy. There is a need for a systematic approach to address this systemic problem - both by reforming existing subsidies and correctly designing new subsidies for tomorrow's priorities.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information