Creative Work Beyond the Creative Industries

Creative Work Beyond the Creative Industries

Innovation, Employment and Education

Edited by Greg Hearn, Ruth Bridgstock, Ben Goldsmith and Jess Rodgers

Creative workers are employed in sectors outside the creative industries often in greater numbers than within the creative field. This is the first book to explore the phenomena of the embedded creative and creative services through a range of sectors, disciplines, and perspectives.

Chapter 3: Compensating differentials in Creative Industries and occupations: some evidence from HILDA

Jason Potts and Tarecq Shehadeh

Subjects: business and management, organisational innovation, organisation studies, innovation and technology, organisational innovation


We interrogate the Household Income Labour Dynamics Australia (HILDA) survey panel for evidence supporting the claim that the market for creative labour is precarious. We find that the assertion of precarious employment is probably overblown, being only relatively evident among creatives within Creative Industries and not at all evident among creatives embedded in other industries. The ‘relative’ precariousness appears more to be a function of the industry, rather than occupational classification, and not systemic to creative employment as a whole. The data also reveal the significant variety of non-monetary compensating factors working to affect the relative desirability of work within the creative sector such that precarity might actually be a dimension against which other terms of compensation are traded. We conclude that, when these compensating differentials are factored in, employment in either Creative Industries and/ or occupations is, in aggregate, neither better nor worse than employment in other sectors.

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