Table of Contents

Handbook of Research Methods on Intuition

Handbook of Research Methods on Intuition

Handbooks of Research Methods in Management series

Edited by Marta Sinclair

How does one go about studying intuition – a complex, cross-disciplinary field, which is still developing? How can intuition be captured in situ? How can a researcher harness their own intuition? This book uses method-related themes to help answer these questions and explore innovative developments in intuition research.

Introduction

Edited by Marta Sinclair

Subjects: business and management, organisational behaviour, research methods in business and management

Extract

It is my pleasure to present you with the second intuition handbook in the Edward Elgar series, this time focused on methodological challenges that researchers around the world have been facing. The key theme is approached rather broadly since intuition research, as a relatively young field of inquiry, is still in the process of conceptual consolidation and cross-disciplinary integration. The goal of the first handbook was to establish an all-inclusive framework that would reconcile conflicting views and propel us beyond the theorizing stage. Indeed, more empirical studies have seen the light of the day since then. Nevertheless, certain aspects of researching intuition as an intangible phenomenon remain ambiguous and some theoretical views have become rather stagnant. That is why this handbook starts with a review of conceptual considerations that shape our choice of methods before it delves into specific techniques. It is refreshing to see that many researchers have progressed from traditional psychological instruments that can measure intuition only indirectly, and often in retrospect, to more innovative approaches. The pendulum seems to be swinging in the direction of qualitative and neurological studies. We started asking such fundamental questions as: Are there really only two information processing systems? How can we capture intuition in situ, maybe even surprise it? We have been also timidly acknowledging that researchers should not shy away from their own feelings and intuitions but rather incorporate them meaningfully into their studies.