Mapping National Innovation Ecosystems

Mapping National Innovation Ecosystems

Foundations for Policy Consensus

Amnon Frenkel and Shlomo Maital

Increasingly, researchers and policymakers alike recognize that innovations are generated by complex and dynamic national ecosystems that include government, industry, universities and schools. Because these systems differ by country and are strongly influenced by culture, effective policy and research strategies require a systems approach, in which policy consensus is built on a clear understanding of how each nation’s innovation ecosystem functions. Scholars and students of innovation and management will find this book an invaluable resource, as will innovation policymakers across the world.

Introduction

Amnon Frenkel and Shlomo Maital

Subjects: business and management, knowledge management, economics and finance, economics of innovation, innovation and technology, economics of innovation, innovation policy

Extract

In this introduction, we explore some of the theory and evidence underlying both policymakers’ and scholars’ growing concern over the continuing weakness of economic growth in the West and the role innovation must play in strengthening it. The great British economist A.C. Pigou once wrote that the goal of research is both fruit and light – light, meaning, better understanding of the world, and fruit, meaning, the ability to change the world in a meaningful way. The objective of this book is both light and fruit – to better understand the innovation process within countries and to provide a better basis for shaping pro-innovation policies. But first, we must ask, why is innovation so crucial to the wellbeing of the world and those who live in it? Why is innovation the first link in the causal chain whose end result is economic wellbeing?