Global Biodiversity Finance

Global Biodiversity Finance

The Case for International Payments for Ecosystem Services

Edited by Joshua Bishop and Chloe Hill

Global Biodiversity Finance sets out the case for scaling up Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) at the international level. The book explores how International Payments for Ecosystem Services (IPES) can help capture the global willingness-to-pay for biodiversity, and how the resulting revenues can be used efficiently to encourage conservation and the sustainable supply of ecosystem services, on which we all depend. This timely volume includes examples of promising initiatives from around the world, supporting an agenda for action to make IPES a reality.

Chapter 3: The two sides of IPES transactions: exploring the motivations for demand and supply

Wendy Proctor, Sissel Waage, Markus Lehmann, Joshua Bishop, Beto Borges and Thomas Koellner

Subjects: economics and finance, environmental economics, environment, ecological economics, management natural resources, valuation


● Interest in international payments for ecosystem services (IPES) is increasing within both the public and private sectors. ● IPES agreements are most likely to focus on ecosystem services that deliver significant public benefits across national boundaries, such as carbon storage and sequestration, certain hydrological services, or biodiversity conservation. ● On the demand side, 'importers' of ecosystem services could include businesses and governments. Prospects for significant private sector demand are likely to depend on the pace and breadth of voluntary corporate action, and/or intergovernmental agreements. ● On the supply side, potential 'exporters' of ecosystem services could include: (1) private or non-governmental landowners; and (2) governments, either national or subnational. _ Motivations to engage in IPES transactions vary across categories of buyers and sellers. Efforts to develop IPES will need to respond to this range of motivations.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

Elgaronline requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals. Please login through your library system or with your personal username and password on the homepage.

Non-subscribers can freely search the site, view abstracts/ extracts and download selected front matter and introductory chapters for personal use.

Your library may not have purchased all subject areas. If you are authenticated and think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

Further information