Teaching Post Keynesian Economics

Teaching Post Keynesian Economics

Edited by Jesper Jespersen and Mogens Ove Madsen

This book contends that post Keynesian economics has its own methodological and didactic basis, and its realistic analysis is much-needed in the current economic and financial crisis. At a time when the original message of Keynes’ General Theory is no longer present in the most university syllabuses, this book celebrates the uniqueness of teaching post Keynesian economics, providing comparisons with traditional economic rationale and illustrating the advantages of post Keynesian pedagogy.

Chapter 1: Teaching post-Keynesian economics in a mainstream department

Marc Lavoie

Subjects: economics and finance, post-keynesian economics, teaching economics


The outline of this chapter is the following. First, I will provide some background information about how I became interested in post-Keynesian economics. This will be followed by a short discussion on the various strategies that can be adopted to teach heterodox economics, in particular in a mainstream department. One of these strategies, creating entire alternative courses, will then be dealt with in more detail, as this was the main strategy that I pursued with some of my colleagues. There are three possible ways in which entire new courses can be created, and these three sub-strategies will be considered in turn, since all three were pursued. Finally, my more recent experience in adapting a first-year textbook will be discussed in the last section, before the conclusion. I have no particular expertise in pedagogy, and so my comments will be limited to elements of autobiography, some history of recent economic thought, the description of some of the courses that I have taught over the years, and a little analytical content.

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