Refugees, Regionalism and Responsibility

Refugees, Regionalism and Responsibility

Elgar Studies in Human Rights series

Penelope Mathew and Tristan Harley

Regional cooperation is sometimes seen as the answer to refugee movements. This book examines whether regional arrangements have resulted in protection and durable solutions for refugees and how responsibility for refugees has been shared at the regional level. Posing critical questions about responsibility-sharing and regionalism, the book is a timely contribution on an issue garnering increasing attention as a result of maritime arrivals in the Mediterranean and Southeast Asia.

Chapter 3: Sharing responsibility among states

Penelope Mathew and Tristan Harley

Subjects: law - academic, human rights, public international law, politics and public policy, human rights, international relations


There is an endemic lack of cooperation regarding the protection of refugees that sees 86 per cent of refugees sheltered in the developing world. After looking at the reasons for the lack of cooperation, this chapter examines why responsibility should be shared, the criteria that should be used for ensuring that responsibility for protecting refugees is distributed equitably among states and the means by which responsibility should be shared.

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